More than 125,000 Iowans are without power after midmorning/early afternoon storm line rolled through, damaging trees and causing at least one area roof significant damage. On Twitter, the city of Ames warned residents to "plan for hours" without power as city crews were out inspecting lines.

As reports roll in, the latest in damage around the metro from the widespread straight-line wind storm, or "derecho":

DES MOINES REGISTER
Almost 125,000 Iowans are without power today after strong storms rolled through late this morning and early afternoon. More than 104,000 MidAmerican Energy customers were without power, according to the utility. Almost 21,000 Alliant Energy customers were also without power, according to Alliant Energy. Buccaneer Arena in Urbandale had its roof partially ripped off. Monday's derecho, which comes from the Spanish word for straight or direct, was not the first derecho to hit the state. In 2011 a derecho knocked out power to more than 24,000 Iowans and caused $5 million in damage.

KCCI: Travel is not advised in several metro cities following the morning storms. 
The city of Ames said via social media that "all of Ames" is out of power and that crews are checking power lines for damage. Ankeny, Boone and Perry issued a "travel not advised" alerts for residents due to damage throughout the city. According to news releases from the cities, residents are asked to stay home and avoid travel if possible. In Waukee, storm damage took out traffic signals at Dartmoor Drive and Hickman Road and intersections on University Avenue east of Alice's Road. Drivers are asked to treat the intersections as four-way stops until power is restored. Portions of Central Iowa saw winds as strong as 99 mph during the morning storm.

WASHINGTON POST: After moving relatively quickly over Central Iowa, eastern Iowa and the greater Chicago are warned to expect the same potential power outages and widespread damaging winds. The "progressive derecho," which was charging east at 70 mph, will blow through northern Illinois and move across the Chicago area between about 2 and 5 p.m., according to the Weather Service.