When I started working at the Business Record nearly three years ago, the bosses explained that reporters are responsible for submitting “One Good Read” every week. Something business-related, they said. Something that will help readers “do business better.” I’m not sure this recent article in the Wall Street Journal meets the “Good Read” criteria. But it’s something business leaders should be aware of. Why? Because their workers may be spending more time trying to figure out what the daily Wordle word is than completing that important project (or story deadline) or being on time for a meeting. They also may be standing around the water cooler -- real and virtual -- debating the best strategy to use to solve the once-a-day online word game. According to an article by the Journal’s Joseph Pisani, that’s what Wordle players are doing now -- arguing how best to play the game. What’s Wordle? It’s an online game in which players have six chances to guess the day’s five-letter word. Type in a word as a guess, and the game tells you which letters are or aren’t in the word, writes Pisani. The goal is to figure out the word with the fewest guesses. The game is free and has no ads. In November, the game had 90,000 daily players; now there are more than 1.8 million. Players have begun debating the best strategy to use for the first word: One with several vowels or one with lots of consonants.  One player has begun starting the game with the word “soare,” which means young hawk, writes Pisani. The player told Pisani that before Wordle, he didn’t know what the word meant. Maybe bosses should be thanking the game’s inventor, Josh Wardle of New York. His game is helping expand the vocabulary of players/workers and it’s got them thinking about something that’s not pandemic-related. Oh, and boss, about that deadline I missed ...