A recent study by Forté reveals that only 6 in 10 male MBAs agree that gender equality has not been achieved. That means 40 percent think that all work is done when it comes to men and women being treated equally at work.

The online survey of 900 male and female MBA alumni who graduated between 2005 and 2017, was conducted by Forté and led by Michelle Wieser, interim dean of the St. Catherine University School of Business. The research is the second in a series released by Forté that explored
whether an MBA holds the key to help women and minorities increase earning power and equality in the workplace, including the impact on the pay gap. 

Have men and women achieved gender equality in the workplace? There was a significant difference in responses by gender. These are a few of the key findings from the research:

  • More than 8 in 10 female MBAs (82%) believe gender equality has not been achieved, and this is even higher for minority women (87%).
  • Only 6 in 10 male MBAs (63%) agree that gender equality has not been achieved.
  • Nearly 6 in 10 MBAs (59%) said they have "personally experienced" or "heard of" gender inequality at "one or more past organizations." This narrows to fewer than 5 in 10 (46%) who have "personally experienced" or "heard of" gender inequality within their "current organization."

Also addressed in the study was whether MBA graduates believe their organizations are working to address gender equality in the workplace. About 4 in 10 (38%) believe their organizations are working to do so. Close to half of the men (47%) thought so, and just one-third of the women (33%).

The full study can be found online.