As we approach the kickoff of Iowa’s celebration of the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote, it’s encouraging to see new research suggest that women are more politically engaged than ever.

According to recently released research by Gender on the Ballot, a national nonpartisan project which seeks to examine and contextualize gender dynamics in the 2020 election cycle, women of all ages and political affiliations — particularly millennials and women of color — have become more politically engaged since 2016, a trend that is likely to continue in the 2020 cycle.

The research also gives further insights into what motivates women and how they plan to participate this year. Here are a few takeaways from the report:

1) Only 16% of all surveyed women voters said they have become less politically involved in the last few years, with more than half (55%) saying their involvement has stayed the same. Almost one third (29%) reported increased involvement.

2) The survey shows Democratic women have been especially motivated to actively participate in the political process, with 35% saying that they’ve become more involved in politics in the last few years, compared to 27% of Republican women and 23% of women who consider themselves Independent.

3) Increased participation is notable among two key voting blocs: 41% of millennial women and 36% of women of color say that they have gotten more involved recently.

4) Women are engaging in a range of activities, but are particularly focused on encouraging friends or family to vote or get involved in a campaign or issue.

5) Despite increased involvement in political issues, women voters identified time (i.e. being too busy working or taking care of family) as the biggest barrier to getting politically involved.

Gender on the Ballot conducted the nationwide survey among 800 likely 2020 presidential voters (including 600 women and 200 men) in December 2019. The full report and key takeaways are available online.